September Gardening Tips for the Southwest

September Gardening tips for the Southwest

September Gardening tips for the Southwest.  Lawn watering should be reduced by frequency and time. This will help avoid lawn fungus or premature yellowing. Shrubs and trees will be the same as above. This does not include newly planted items. So please enjoy the much-needed moisture. Hopefully, this will translate into more snow for our area?

September mornings are great aren’t they? September is a great time to start planting trees and shrubs. It is a great time because the above ground temperatures are dropping and the below ground temps are still warm.

This helps plants get a jump on next spring because the roots still develop in the warm soil while the tops slow down in growth. Also, there are less winds and typically more moisture during this time of year, which of course reduces stress on newly planted shrubs and trees. You should be able to plant just about anything, including pansies, (which will last thru next May) mums, winter veggies (starts), most trees and shrubs.

September Gardening tips for the Southwest

September Gardening tips for the SouthwestThere are a few exceptions: Palm trees might be better planted in the spring and summer, in order to get a good root establishment before the winter sets in. (for the southern part of New Mexico)

Oleanders may experience some winter kill if planted too late in the season, especially the 1-gallon size. The larger sizes seem to suffer the least winter kill. This is usually for the first winter, after that they will have even less winter or no winter kill as they age. Using a winterizer fertilizer with plenty of potash will help increase winter hardiness on just about all shrubs and trees.

It is recommended for valuable plants that may suffer from winter damage. Use this product before October 30th. Don’t forget to use compost, peat moss, or soil builder and root stimulator on all plantings, and make sure plants have adequate water.

 

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