star-jasmine-ground

How to Grow Star Jasmine Vine

How to Grow Star Jasmine Vine (Trachelospermum jasminoides).  This vine will do well in the southwest providing you follow some of the recommendations outlined in this article.

It is an exceptionally fast growing evergreen vine that will do well in partial shade.  It does not mind the hot southwest weather but it will do better in shade.  Do water consistently during the summer months as it is not a drought tolerant vine.

How to Grow Star Jasmine Vine
Star Jasmine – Landscape Credit: Geoff Bryant

Where to plant it

Plant it in a shady spot if possible. Underneath a tree that gives filtered light will work wonders.  Or on the east or north side of a wall, fence or dwelling.  It will creep and crawl its limbs until it gets about 20ft. wide and about 10 ft. tall if planted as a stand-up vine or container.  It will need a trellis or fence with support to climb.

Use it in a large container or espaliered vine.  It does not mind being in a container. However,  water more often for a better-looking plant during the summer, every other day will suffice.   Be sure your pot has good drainage otherwise it will develop root rot.  Fertilize with a good 20-20-20 analysis fertilizer.  Once in spring, summer, and fall.

You can also use it as a ground-cover.  Again, place it in a shady spot it will struggle if you plant it in full blazing hot sun especially as a ground-cover.

Does it have a flower

Yes, it does.  And a very fragrant flower at that!  It will bloom from mid-spring until the hot southwest sun comes around, usually around early June or so.  After that, it is basically an evergreen plant.

How to grow Star Jasmine
The white fragrant flower of the Star Jasmine

 

Insects or diseases

Aphids, scale, and mites are a problem for Star Jasmine.  They will suck the juice from the foliage and stems or produce small indentions into the leaves thus giving them an ugly appearance.

A good systemic insecticide will get rid of them quickly. Apply this insecticide at the first sight of these pests.  The sooner you act the quicker they will be gone.  Try neem oil as an organic substitute for insecticides.  Insecticidal soap is also a good alternative but it does take numerous applications before it kills insects.

Fusarium wilt is a fungal disease that will destroy the Star Jasmine.  But, it basically happens in places where there is lots of rainfall around the southwest this is not a big problem.  As I mentioned earlier this plant does require lots of water and shady conditions.  You will have to keep an eye on your watering systems.  Leaks and overspray from sprinklers will promote fungal diseases.  Use a good fungicide to remove Fusarium wilt.  It will take numerous application before it is removed.

Vines for the Southwest.

How to Grow Star Jasmine Vine
Star Jasmine on a North Side of a wall. Photo Credit Doreen Wynja

How to Grow Star Jasmine Vine

 

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Paul Guzman – Husband, Father, Grandfather, Gardener, and Webmaster of GuzmansGreenhouse.com

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Comments

    • Cindy
    • January 23, 2018
    Reply

    Can you tell me the botanical name of Star Jasmine?

      • Paul Guzman
      • January 23, 2018
      Reply

      Yes, I can “Trachelospermum jasminoides”. I will add it to our Star Jasmine page.

    • Wendy Biondo
    • March 5, 2018
    Reply

    I want to grow this vine inside my home around an east facing window. Is this realistic?? And do you have this plant for purchase right now? Thank you! 🙂

      • Paul Guzman
      • March 6, 2018
      Reply

      Yes, you can grow this inside your home. But, it will take more care as opposed to planting it outside. Possibly more water and fertilizer for good growth inside. The star Jasmine likes shade so indoors will work fine as long as it gets some sun from a window nearby.

        • Wendy Biondo
        • March 16, 2018
        Reply

        Great! Thank you!

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