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Pine Trees Southwest

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Pine Trees Southwest  -These pine trees are hardy in the lower elevations of the southwest. Be sure to click on the photo for a complete description and zone requirements. Hey, just because the southwest is a desert area does not mean evergreen pine trees will survive the heat.

With proper water and care, they will thrive. This means you can have that ponderosa forest-like landscape right in your own back or front yard.

Hey, just because the southwest is a desert area does not mean evergreen pine trees will survive the heat. With proper water and care, they will thrive.  This means you can have that ponderosa forest-like landscape right in your own back or front yard.


Pine Trees SouthwestAfghan Pine (Pinus Eldarica)

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 – 8 Also called the Desert pine, Mondell pine or the Eldarica pine. This pine tree is common throughout the Southwest. It will grow to 70-80 ft. tall and about 4-5 ft.  wide.

Well adapted for the Southwest regions of the U.S.  drought tolerant once established.  There is a lot of maintenance involved with this pine tree.   Pine needles and cones will drop almost year-round but it does provide good shade and screen from the neighbors.

I would not recommend planting this tree in a small landscape area.  It needs lots of room to grow and spread.

The Ponderosa, Mugho, and Austrian pines will also do well here in the Southwest. Color Your world nurseries will usually have this type of pine trees.


Pine Trees Southwest
Pinus Nigra – A great Pine tree for the Desert Southwest

Austrian Pine Pinus Nigra

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 – 8.  A great looking Confier evergreen tree with a densely-branched conical form.  As the tree matures it will form an umbrella-shaped canopy.

Needles are long and dark green. Superb for windbreaks or shade tree. Useful as a standalone pine or use them to form a large border.  Less maintenance and cleanup than the Afghan pine tree.  This tree does well in the Southwest once established it needs only moderate watering.

It is a fast-growing tree up to 40 to 60 ft. tall, 15 to 25 ft. wide.  Less maintenance and cleanup than the Eldrica pine.


Pine trees southwestPinon tree Live Christmas – Pinus monophylla

Did you know this tree is the New Mexico State Tree? This pinon tree does not get large about 15′ in height and width. Also called the Pinyon Pine Tree.
Use it for an indoor live Christmas tree in a container then plant outdoors for a beautiful drought-tolerant ornamental tree.   Use them as a stand-a-alone tree or use them to make a border landscape line.  Low maintenance and very little pine needles and cones falling on the ground.

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8

 


Ponderosa Pine
Image by M. Maggs from Pixabay

The Ponderosa Pine Tree (Pinus ponderosa)

This pine tree will do well throughout the Rocky Mountain Region.  Can grow up to 200 ft. in height and about 4-6 ft. wide it can tolerate drought conditions but will do better if it can get more water during its first 10 years after initial planting.  Its taproot will shoot straight down until it finds the water table.

The Ponderosa pine needs lots of room to grow and is not suitable for small areas or where there isn’t sufficient space for it to grow.  It will drop needles and pine cones so there is lots of maintenance involved.

Many landscapers and gardeners mistake this tree for the Afghan Pine, but the Afghan pine is much shorter and the trunk is not as wide.


The Aleppo pine tree (pinus halepensis)

Is native to the Mediterranean region.  It is a good ornamental pine tree for the Southwest if you can find a nursery that carries it.  It is drought-tolerant and likes room to grow will produce pine cones and will require yard maintenance during the summer and fall months.  Grows anywhere from 40 to 80 ft. in height and about 40 ft. in width.  It is susceptible to pine blight so watch for browning on tips of pine needles.  Aphids will also attack this tree but rarely does much damage, especially on mature trees.

Learn more about Insects and Diseases on plants.


California Christmas Tree

The California Christmas tree (Cedrus deodara) is not really a pine. It is in the Cedar family.  Read more about this tree right here.

Pine Trees Southwest

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