vinca

Vinca Plant Care

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Vinca Plant Care.  Vinca Plants (Catharanthus roseus) Is a colorful plant that can tolerate heat.  Commonly known as Madagascar periwinkle. They come in bright red, white, pink and purple and they thrive in full sun providing you water them every other day or so.  Thick glossy leaves that repel insects.

Do not get them confused with the trailing or vinca minor plants.  AKA the periwinkle vine with a blue or violet flower.  You can see it on this page Ground Cover Plants.

How to keep Vinca Flowering?

Fertilize them often about once every 2 weeks or so.  A good all-purpose fertilizer with an analysis of 20-20-20 will work.  It’s important that the soil drains well.

This will help with growth and blooms throughout the growing season.  The growing season is from mid-spring till about mid-fall.
Vinca Plant Care

Vinca Plant Care

They will also do great in containers.  You can also plant them in the ground but in and around the southwest it is considered an annual.  They will grow up to 8″ in height and will spread about 2-4″ wide.

They are considered a nuisance plant in tropical areas but around the southwest, this will not become a problem.

Where to plant Annual Vinca?

Plant them in rock gardens, or in pots in front of your home and they don’t mind full sun, they will also do well in morning sun and afternoon shade.

Vinca Plant Care
A nice entryway with two large pots filled with red vinca.

 

Vinca in Hanging Baskets

All plants in hanging baskets need a little more attention as opposed to planting them in the ground.  Vince in hanging baskets needs to be watered every other day during mid-spring and mid-fall.  During the hot summertime, they need water every day.  Yes, every day and mornings are more beneficial than afternoon watering.

Constant watering will leech out the nutrients in a hanging basket.  It is best to fertilize at least once per month during the growing seasons.  This is typically spring, summer, and early fall.

Vinca in Hanging Baskets
Red Vinca in a hanging basket

Purple Vinca for the Garden

Vinca Plant Care

Problems with Vinca?

It is susceptible to root-rot so be extra sure your containers or soil drains well. Water in the morning to help with fungus problems.  The thick leaves will help keep insects away but aphids and mites will attack this plant. Spray with an insecticide spray at the first sign of these pests.  More information here on how to get rid of these insects.  Vinca is deer and rabbit resistant.

Learn more about this plant over at Wikipedia.

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Comments

    • John Bokich
    • May 17, 2020
    Reply

    Paul, a question and a comment. Q – last year I had a problem with my tomatoes have the ends brown and ‘slimy’. Not good. What can I do to prevent? I bought Early Girl and Sweet 100 from Color Your World. Plants doing great, but want good tomatoes. Comment, we plant Vincas because durable and attractive, and the rabbits and deer do not eat them (we live at Elephant Butte).

    1. Reply

      Hello, John. What you have is called “blossom end rot” on your tomatoes and is caused by not having enough calcium in your soil.

      There are all kinds of ways to help with this problem online. From powdered milk to eggshells. But the easiest solution is to purchase calcium nitrate. and work it into your soil. It’s important to note that tomatoes that have this will not regain their skin or look even after applying calcium nitrate or any other calcium, however, the tomato plant should recover and produce good tomatoes.

    • John Bokich
    • May 17, 2020
    Reply

    So when is the right time to apply calcium nitrate to the sil for tomatoe blossom end rot? Before blossoms/fruits start to develop? Or after blossoms or fruit starts to develop?

    1. Reply

      You can apply calcium nitrate right now. There is still Time…if you wait until mid-summer it is too late.

    • John Bokich
    • May 17, 2020
    Reply

    Thanks, hope that you have in stock.

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