virginia-creeper

Fast growing vines for fences

Fast Growing Vines for Fences

Vines are a great way to landscape your home.  Fast growing vines for fences.  They are low maintenance and look great along on a wall or fence. If you’ve got a chain-link fence, brick, or rock fence, then growing a vine over it can be a quick and aesthetically pleasing solution. However, there are many types of vines for different situations, whether you are trying to grow it up the side of a house, along with the ground, or up a tree.

Many vines can grow fast most have flowers in spring, and many will have flowers all summer long. They are very easy to direct, so they can make a border around your garden, or just weave in and out with other plants.

Vines as Ground Cover

Did you know many vines can be used as ground cover?  If you want green on your bare ground you can use vines to cover almost any ground landscape.  Many vines are resistant to being stepped on. It’s a leafy, nice alternative to grass. Even if you have kids and a dog, it should have no problem staying alive. Consistent watering and occasional fertilizer would help it look good throughout the growing season.

Start Jasmine, English Ivy, and Periwinkle vine will work well as ground cover.  In and around the southwest they like shady conditions so underneath a tree would work or morning sun and afternoon shade will also work well.

I would not place them on top of rock landscape especially in full sun as the foliage will get sun scorched during the mid summer southwestern sun!

Fast growing vines for fences
Star Jasmine for ground cover

Fast growing vines for fences
Periwinkle – Vinca Minor

Twining Vines

The “twinning” vine refers to their method of climbing with some type of support. Twining vines require a lattice, trellis, chain link fence or a porous surface to climb on because they will not stick to a wall or stucco walls. They just climb by sending out small tendrils to loop around whatever is nearby. I suggest using this type of vine for climbing up trees, or any type of mesh. Usually, you have to guide them a lot more during their early stages, and after that, they will go wherever you want them to.

  1. Star Jasmine
  2. Trumpet Vines
  3. Climbing Roses
  4. Japanese Honeysuckle
  5. Tangerine Crossvine
  6. Bougainvillea
  7. Japanese Wisteria
  8. Coral Vine (Miguelito)
Fast growing vines for fences
Photo Credit – Doreen Wynja.l Coral Vine also called Miguelitos, Queens Wreath, Mexican Creeper and Corona de Reina.

Fast growing vines for fences
Trumpet vines for a border wall

Clinging Vines

Climbing vines adhere themselves using tiny aerial rootlets that attach into crevices, concrete walls or stucco walls.  They do not need support to wrap around.  English Ivy and Boston Ivy are great examples of clinging vines.  Virginia Creeper is another vine that will cling to walls.

Clinging vines list below.

  1. Creeping Fig
  2. Boston Ivy
  3. English Ivy
  4. Virginia Creeper

How do vines attach themselves to walls

Vines not only look good on the ground or on fences you can blend them in to the very architecture of your house. This is usually achieved through the use of vines with small tendrils that have adhesive tips. They extend from the vine and attach themselves to almost any surface. If your garden is adjacent to your house and you want something to camouflage the big ugly wall, it’s a great idea to start out a few vines near the base. If you have a vine like the Virginia Creeper growing, then your entire wall will be covered in a matter of months.

Here is a great article on vines that will grow on masonry walls.

Hide walls with vines

If you have a vine like the Virginia Creeper or type of ivy growing, then your entire wall will be covered in a matter of months. However, I have seen situations where the vine gets out of control.  These vines will get invasive if you do not trim them on a regular basis.

Fast Growing Vines for Fences
Virginia Creeper Surrounding Window

If your garden is next to your house and you want something to camouflage the big wall, you could start out a few vines near the base. If you have a vine like the Virginia Creeper growing, then your entire wall will be covered in a matter of months. However, I have seen situations where the vine got out of control. After that, you have no choice but to take out your shears and start pruning your vine.

Ivy Plants

One of the vines that you would probably recognize is English Ivy. You see it around a lot, generally because it is so adaptable. Out of the types, I mentioned above (ground, twining, and sticky pads), Ivy can fill in for pretty much anything. It makes a great ground cover and will grow up about any surface you put it on. Although it grows quick and strong, I wouldn’t suggest growing it up your house. This is because recently, buildings which have had ivy for many years have found that it has been deteriorating the building.

Fast growing vines for fences
English Ivy growing up a wooden wall

All Ivies will make a great ground cover and will grow up about any surface you put it on. Although it grows quick and strong, It might not be a good idea since ivy will deteriorate a wall.  It’s best to have them grown on fences, rock walls or a chain link fence.

So no matter what you want to do with a vine, you should have no problem getting it to grow. They are easy fast growing plants and you should always do your research beforehand and find out about any negative traits the vine may have (such as its ability to deteriorate walls, in Ivy’s case.)

More information Vines for the Southwest.

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Comments

    • Stan Bass
    • August 27, 2017
    Reply

    Paul, thank you for all of these important articles. My wife & I (retired, born & raised at the Old Mountain Chuke) recently retired to LC for good, and today, we bought 3 starters–a trumpet vine, a hollyhock, and a Mexican Bird of Paradise. We really appreciate your help! We’ll be back.

      • Paul Guzman
      • August 28, 2017
      Reply

      Thanks, for compliment Stan.

    • Alice
    • July 12, 2018
    Reply

    Will Virginia creeper grow in a greenhouse

    1. Reply

      Yes, Alice, Virginia creeper will do well in a greenhouse. Matter of fact it will thrive providing you care for it the same way you would if you planted it outdoors.

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